AI in EE

AI IN DIVISIONS

AI in Computer Division

AI in EE

AI IN DIVISIONS

AI in Computer Division ​

AI in Computer Division

SLUGGER: Lossless Hierarchical Summarization of Massive Graphs

Kyuhan Lee*, Jihoon Ko*, and Kijung Shin

ICDE 2022: IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering 2022

Abstract: Given a massive graph, how can we exploit its hierarchical structure for concisely but exactly summarizing the graph? By exploiting the structure, can we achieve better compression rates than state-of-the-art graph summarization methods?

The explosive proliferation of the Web has accelerated the emergence of large graphs, such as online social networks and hyperlink networks. Consequently, graph compression has become increasingly important to process such large graphs without expensive I/O over the network or to disk. Among a number of approaches, graph summarization, which in essence combines similar nodes into a supernode and describe their connectivity concisely, protrudes with several advantages. However, we note that it fails to exploit pervasive hierarchical structures of real-world graphs as its underlying representation model enforces supernodes to be disjoint.

In this work, we propose the hierarchical graph summarization model, which is an expressive graph representation model that includes the previous one proposed by Navlakha et al. as a special case. The new model represents an unweighted graph using positive and negative edges between hierarchical supernodes, each of which can contain others. Then, we propose Slugger, a scalable heuristic for concisely and exactly representing a given graph under our new model. Slugger greedily merges nodes into supernodes while maintaining and exploiting their hierarchy, which is later pruned. Slugger significantly accelerates this process by sampling, approximation, and memoization. Our experiments on 16 real-world graphs show that Slugger is (a) Effective: yielding up to 29.6% more concise summary than state-of-the-art lossless summarization methods, (b) Fast: summarizing a graph with 0.8 billion edges in a few hours, and (c) Scalable: scaling linearly with the number of edges in the input graph.